but seriously...

Irreverent social commentary with a Caribbean bias

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Seriously Benjai, what the fuck?

If you couldn’t tell, the video above is semi NSFW. Everything in this video is semi, really. A semi-ok song at the soca semi-finals, and… oh fuck it.

Watch the video and congratulate Benjai for taking one big step towards equality in sexual objectification.

BTW, he didn’t make it to the finals.

Filed under justmigrate

1 note &

"What is the best way to ease someone’s pain and suffering? In this beautifully animated RSA Short, Dr Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities."

I know I needed to be reminded of this.

Via Blazenfluff

Filed under mindhack thoughts positivity

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What kind of mirror image do you have of yourself? When a government steals from people in the way of consumption taxes and takes that money and spends it on their own high lifestyles, and unnecessary buildings, then that government not only has contempt for you, but what is most unfortunate, you have contempt for yourself, because you allow them to do it.
Errol Barrow, 1986

Filed under barbados independence day truth

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Allow me a soapbox to speak of my recovery

image

No, I could not find another image that suited this post.

Looking back on my naiveté in this post  and how I laughed it off as a run-of-the-mill gym injury, I can’t believe the last two weeks I’ve had and how godamn fragile and unpredictable life is.

Yes, I had multiple muscle strain and all that stuff, but it quickly progressed to a potentially deadly condition called rhabdomyolysis - a fact that was missed by two qualified emergency medicine specialists in Barbados. I didn’t think there was anything worse than the apocalyptic pain I was in, but clearly I was wrong.

By the time a friend suggested that I get a blood test to determine my kidney function and muscle enzyme levels, I was well past the point at which remedial therapy to avoid acute renal failure is of any use.

Luckily, despite the failures to spot what I really was sick with, I made it through. My third doctor said it was weird to be that badly off and not have at least some kidney damage, so I should count myself lucky.

Coming back from that, and to be able to use my arms to shower/brush my teeth/put a shirt on and not writhe in unconscionable pain at every turn, so many things that seemed like big mental stressors prior to November 19 don’t even matter.

Moral: It’s amazing the power that we can give to minor bullshit to determine how we see and feel about our lives. 

Filed under justmigrate

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What Caricom did next….

What Caricom did next….

I really hope you are all aware of the ongoing mess on the island of Hispaniola, and the Dominican Republic’s court ruling to strip persons of Haitian descent of Dominican citizenship.

You are then probably aware of the piecemeal attempts being made by Kamla Persad-Bissesar (Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago and Chair of CARICOM) to sanction the Dominican Republic, and the more furious agitations of Ralph Gonsalves (Prime Minister of St. Vincent & The Grenadines and incoming-Chair of CARICOM) to do the same. 

See here this insightful commentary by tillahwillah on this sad, sad saga in the Community, with an indictment for other CARICOM member states as well.

tillahwillah:

It is especially repugnant that the ruling ignores the 2005 judgement made by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) that the Dominican Republic adapt its immigration laws and practices in accordance with the provisions of the American Convention on Human Rights. The ruling also…

Filed under justmigrate

17 notes &

What Caricom did next....

I really hope you are all aware of the ongoing mess on the island of Hispaniola, and the Dominican Republic’s court ruling to strip persons of Haitian descent of Dominican citizenship.

You are then probably aware of the piecemeal attempts being made by Kamla Persad-Bissesar (Prime Minister of Trinidad & Tobago and Chair of CARICOM) to sanction the Dominican Republic, and the more furious agitations of Ralph Gonsalves (Prime Minister of St. Vincent & The Grenadines and incoming-Chair of CARICOM) to do the same. 

See here this insightful commentary by tillahwillah on this sad, sad saga in the Community, with an indictment for other CARICOM member states as well.

tillahwillah:

It is especially repugnant that the ruling ignores the 2005 judgement made by the Inter-American Court on Human Rights (IACHR) that the Dominican Republic adapt its immigration laws and practices in accordance with the provisions of the American Convention on Human Rights. The ruling also…

0 notes &

While you may see an ass with not even a basic understanding of Bajan physical geography, I see - an artist.

image

This, quite clearly, is a brilliant artistic commentary which revisits the self/nation perception narratives in Errol Barrow’s iconic “mirror image" speech.

This cake forces us to step back from long-held subjective norms and points of pride to hold a mirror up to ourselves and ponder what Barbados’ national reflection really looks like some 47 years post-Independence. The artist seems to be making a bold statement that the state of Barbados today is utterly unrecognisable from the Barbados we once knew.

Nothing less than a NIFCA Gold Medal for the pastry department at Cost-U-Less.

Filed under justmigrate

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You probably should watch this

'We Were Here' is the first film to take a deep and reflective look back at the arrival and impact of AIDS in San Francisco, and how the City's inhabitants dealt with that unprecedented calamity. Though this is a San Francisco based story, the issues it addresses extend not only beyond San Francisco but also beyond AIDS itself. 'We Were Here' speaks to our societal relationship to death and illness, our capacity as individuals to rise to the occasion, and the importance of community in addressing unimaginable crises.

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I started watching this last week (you can watch it here), but at the time it was too hard to finish because, quite frankly, it is unnerving to see unless you know your HIV status - whether you’re gay or straight. 

Now that I know I can breathe a sigh of relief, I’ve watched it all and I think you should too.

If all goes according to plan, I’ll be specialising in Public Health soon with a focus on HIV/AIDS and, in particular, its prevalence and risk factors among sexual minorities. From that aspect alone this film was awesome, but whether gay or straight it will force some useful introspection that even the best of HIV/AIDS campaigns would fail to do.

Filed under justmigrate